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Celebrating National Nursing Assistant Week

This week June 9-16, 2016 Americans across the nation celebrated an important holiday. National Nursing Assistant Week was established to highlight the important work of more than 4,5 million caregivers in the United States who selflessly help patients when they need it the most.

To express my gratitude and sincere appreciation of America’s nursing assistants, I issued a press release in honor of National Nursing Assistant Week. Please read the press release below and feel free to spread awareness about this holiday by sharing it with your friends and family:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/Bruce-Dalglish/Philadelphia/prweb13474524.htm

Alliance Hospice CEO R. Bruce Dalglish Celebrates National Nursing Assistant Week

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) June 09, 2016 — In recognition of National Nursing Assistant Week taking place on June 9-16, R. Bruce Dalglish, founder and CEO of the Philadelphia area-headquartered Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice, applauds nursing assistants around the nation, highlighting the important role they play in the lives of people in their care.

“Nursing assistants are instrumental in any medical profession, and especially in hospice care. Without the dedication of these workers, hospice care would not be what it is today,” said R. Bruce Dalglish, CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice. “I would like to express my sincerest gratitude and appreciation of all the hard-working men and women who provide hands-on care to patients in nursing homes, palliative, hospice and other care settings.”

R. Bruce Dalglish added: “A large part of health care is creating trust between patients and medical staff, and nursing assistants create this trust. These important professionals provide 80 to 90 percent of direct care to patients in long term care facilities. And, as we constantly strive to provide our patients at Alliance and All Caring Hospice centers with the absolute best care, we cannot underestimate the significance of the services that nursing assistants provide.”

National Nursing Assistant Week is dedicated to showcasing and further fostering the wonderful relationship between patients and nursing assistants, as well as to expressing appreciation towards more than 4.5 million caregivers who are there to help our elderly and chronically ill citizens when they need it the most.

About the Author

A resident of Philadelphia, R. Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 –2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn and Google+.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Hospice Choirs Provide Peace and Comfort to Patients

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Recently, I came across an Associated Press article about a capella groups that volunteer at hospice centers throughout the nation singing for the elderly and terminally ill. With their calming melodies, the choirs offer much needed emotional relief and comforting to the patients and their relatives.

Singing to the terminally ill has been a part of human tradition for millennia, waning in the modern age due to the advent of hospitals. Many people believe that music purges painful feelings, such as stress, fear, anxiety and grief, and allows for positive feelings, such as love and appreciation to take its place. By singing with family and friends, hospice care patients can find piece and comfort during their last days.

The choirs treat every patient differently, selecting their songs and melodies depending on the patient’s preference, religion, and hobbies.

Even though members of these choirs are usually neither classically trained singers, nor are they trained hospice workers, they choose to dedicate their time to uplift and offer patients a little respite.

Establishing emotional connections and connecting with patients on a personal level are extremely important for quality hospice care – which is why initiatives such as hospice choirs are extremely valuable to patients and hospice centers around the nation.

About the Author


A resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn, Google+ and YouTube.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Celebrating National Nursing Home Week

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

This month, from May 8th to May 14th, America celebrated an important holiday. National Nursing Home Week was established in 1967 as a time for citizens nationwide to celebrate and promote relations between nursing home residents, family, staff, and the community.

The theme of this year’s National Nursing Home Week, announced by the American Health Care Association earlier this year is “ It’s a Small World, with a Big Heart” to commemorate a historical time for older adults. “It’s a Small World” comes from the Disney song “It’s a Small World After All”, which was popular during the 1960’s. “With a Big Heart” symbolizes staff and family embracing residents and patients in communal love and friendship.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014 there were about 15,600 nursing homes in the United States, with that number only growing. As Americans’ life expectancies rise, the need for specialized nursing home staff is increasing as well.

Currently, traditional nursing homes and assisted living communities collaborate with hospice care centers to meet the emotional and spiritual needs of the dying. That is why today nursing homes around the country are looking to All Caring Hospice and Alliance Hospice for the most professional and compassionate care.

Since 2005, Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice have been leading providers of hospice care in the United States. We know that without nursing homes and the impassioned people running them, our jobs would be much harder.

This is why on behalf of all our staff at All Caring Hospice and Alliance Hospice, I would like to express our gratitude to all nursing homes around the country for their important work and dedication to their patients. I would also like to encourage people whose relatives live in a nursing home to take time to visit them.

About the Author


A resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn, Google+ and YouTube.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Palliative and Hospice Care: a Look Ahead

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

With over 90 million Americans suffering from serious long-term or chronic illnesses, palliative and hospice care services are bound to play an ever-increasing role in the modern healthcare system.

It is projected that by year 2029, there will be more than 70 million Americans age 65 or older. As our baby boom generation continues to age, the influx of elderly patients will pose a significant challenge for our healthcare system.

Currently, traditional hospitals are not well equipped to provide quality care for those in the final stages of their life. Most hospitals lack the necessary guidelines and training to meet the unique emotional and spiritual needs of the dying.

This is why, along with expanding the existing network of palliative and hospice care centers in the coming years, more specialized training should be provided to strengthen the end-of-life care capabilities of hospitals worldwide.

The new healthcare approach will put a greater emphasis on patients’ physical, social and emotional needs, along with extended support services for their family members. The current perception and awareness about palliative and hospice care is already changing.

As we move forward, the role of dedicated palliative and hospice care centers in the overall patient care experience will continue to increase. What we do now will pave the way for the future of a more efficient, personalized and consumer-centric, healthcare.

About the Author


A resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).
Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn, Google+ and YouTube.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Negative Misperception Prevents Patients from Benefitting from Palliative Care, Research Shows

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Pennsylvania

New research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal indicates that many patients associate the term “palliative care” with imminent death, which prevents them from even considering this type of care.

Lead study author and head of the division of palliative care at the University Health Network in Toronto Dr. Camilla Zimmermann commented: “Patients and caregivers in our study saw palliative care as being equated with death, loss of hope, dependency, and going into places you never get out of again.”

Indeed, in my own experience as CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice centers, I often meet people who are reluctant to take advantage of the supportive therapies that can dramatically improve their quality of live just because of the negative stigma associated with the term “palliative care.”

The fact is, however, that palliative care has nothing to do with death. On the contrary, the numerous benefits offered by palliative care through pain and other symptom management have been proven to improve the patients’ quality of live, thus increasing chances for recovery. Unlike hospice care, palliative care is recommended throughout the course of an illness, and not only at the end of life.

The recent study highlights an important problem of the common misconception that exists in the media, our healthcare system and people’s minds. To fix it, we should reconsider the way we talk about palliative care with patients. Rather than offering it as a last resort, doctors should rightly position palliative care as a way to continue combatting an illness, while also being able to maintain the highest possible quality of life.

About the Author


A resident of Philadelphia, Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).
Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn and Google+.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Celebrating National Healthcare Decisions Day

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia

Last Saturday on April 16, America celebrated an important holiday. National Healthcare Decisions Day was established to educate the public and healthcare professionals about the value of advance healthcare planning for people of all ages and medical histories.

To share this critical message and help raise awareness about this key concern, I issued a press release highlighting the significance of making your healthcare wishes known to your family and loved ones, and urging doctors to discuss advance care planning with patients.

Please read my recent press release below and share it with your friends and family:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/Bruce-Dalglish/Philadelphia/prweb13344392.htm

R. Bruce Dalglish Highlights the Importance of Proactive Healthcare Planning on National Healthcare Decisions Day

In honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day, R. Bruce Dalglish, CEO of Philadelphia area headquartered Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice, today highlighted the importance of advance healthcare planning in preventing unnecessary medical expenses, and ensuring that your healthcare choices are known.

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) April 15, 2016

Founder and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice, R. Bruce Dalglish today celebrated the National Healthcare Decisions Day and highlighted the importance of proactive planning and making your healthcare choices known to family and loved ones.

“Regardless of age and health history, it is important that all of us plan ahead and put our healthcare preferences in writing,” said R. Bruce Dalglish, CEO of Philadelphia area headquartered Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice. “We all want to stay healthy for as long as possible, and no one likes to think of situations where they might become incapacitated to make their own decisions regarding the type of healthcare they want to receive. But unexpected health crises do happen, and that is why we need to ensure that our healthcare choices are known in case of an emergency.”

R. Bruce Dalglish added: “As we celebrate the National Healthcare Decisions Day, I would like to use my platform to help raise awareness about the importance of advance healthcare planning. I would like to encourage healthcare professionals to start conversations with their patients and help educate the public about the value of advance care planning. Theses conversations can prevent unnecessary medical expenses and save families from having to guess what their loved ones would want in case of a sudden health crisis.”

Celebrated on April 16, the National Healthcare Decisions Day was established to empower and educate the public and healthcare providers about the importance of advance care planning. The initiative encourages patients and families to discuss their wishes regarding healthcare and make them known to each other and their healthcare providers.

About the Author

A resident of Philadelphia, R. Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn and Google+.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

What You Need to Know about Hospice Care

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia, PA

Generally, hospice care is reserved for people who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness and have six or less months to live. At this point, patients stop undergoing aggressive therapies, and their health care shifts toward the focus on the quality of life and comfort.

Patients can receive Hospice care at home, at an assisted-living facility or a specialized hospice care center. Rather than administering curative treatment, hospice care is centered on managing pain, controlling symptoms, providing emotional support and assuring a comfortable way of life during a person’s last days. Doctors and nurses are available to hospice care patients 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and special grief and bereavement counseling is provided to the patients’ families.

The decision on whether to move a loved one into hospice care can be difficult and is often determined by a number of emotional, financial and practical factors. Although you need a doctor’s written approval to qualify for hospice care, it is recommended that families do their research in advance. Since different hospices may function a bit differently, it may be worth to visit several local centers and find a provider that feels right for your family.

Since 2005, Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice have been leading providers of comprehensive competent hospice care in the United States. With corporate headquarters in the Philadelphia suburb of Ambler, PA., All Caring Hospice and Alliance Hospice have conveniently located hospice centers in South Carolina, Georgia and Ohio. Both providers accept most private insurance and are licensed by Medicare and Medicaid.

To learn more about Alliance Hospice, visit: http://alliancehospice.com

To learn more about All Caring Hospice, go to: http://allcaringhospice.com

About the Author

A resident of Philadelphia, Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn and Google+.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

Palliative Care: Improving Patient Experience and Quality of Life

By R. Bruce Dalglish of Philadelphia, PA

My name is Bruce Dalglish, and I am the CEO of the Philadelphia area-based corporate headquarters of All Caring Hospice and Alliance Hospice. In today’s blog, I would like to discuss the topic of palliative care.

Palliative care serves the most vulnerable population in our country: these are people who deal with the most complex life-threatening health issues. Palliative care is designed to focus on the patient’s specific needs during the most difficult and challenging time in his or her life. As CEO of a network of hospice centers, I regularly meet with palliative care patients and their families. What I’ve learned over the years is how important it is for patients to feel normal and have the opportunity to enjoy the simple things and experiences of life. These experiences are often the key to easing the suffering and prolonging the lives of palliative care patients.

Understanding the human needs of a patient is what differentiates good palliative care from other forms of healthcare. With this idea in mind, we opened our first All Caring and Alliance Hospice Centers. From our headquarters in greater Philadelphia, to our centers in Ohio, Georgia and South Carolina, our devoted staff strives to deliver an improved patient experience and enhanced quality of life to our patients. Connecting with our patients on a personal level and seeing them as humans with unique histories, feelings and needs is central in our approach to patient care.

From the diagnosis to the end of life, good palliative care works in synergy with what is really important to the patient, taking it one day at a time. Studies show that palliative care patients experience less pain, less depression, require fewer hospitalizations and live at least three to six months longer than patients without palliative care.
Sooner or later everyone has to face the journey to the end of their lives, but palliative care is not about dying – it’s about living. We may not be able to change the final outcome, but we do have the ability to decide how we get there.

About the Author


A resident of Philadelphia, Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).
Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter, Facebook, LinkeIn and Google+.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

How Do Families Afford Non-Health Care Hospice-Related Expenses?

By R. Bruce Dalglish

In my role as CEO of Alliance Hospice, a frequent question I encounter is – how do families afford to pay for all of the expenses involved during the end-of-life stage? While many families are fortunate enough to be able to handle some of these expenses, many families struggle to pay for expenses that fall outside of the standard health care realm. These expenses typically cover needs that are significant to the patients’ and families’ physical, emotional and spiritual comfort.

In recognition of this important need, the Alliance Hospice Memorial Fund – a 501 c (3) organization, was established with the following mission in mind: “to honor those who have died on hospice…by providing those we continue to serve with a sense of their personal worth.” The donations made to this fund directly assist Alliance Hospice patients and families, and their needs are assessed by the Alliance Hospice Foundation Board along with the Interdisciplinary team involved.

A sad reality is that a sizeable number of terminally ill patients and their families are not financially prepared or equipped to pay for the expenses incurred during the dying process.

To help these families in need during such an emotional time, the Alliance Hospice Memorial Foundation accepts donations to help cover these important expenses including: funeral costs, airfare for loved ones, assistance with rent/mortgage/utility bills, and even fans for people without air conditioning.

For more information about the Alliance Hospice Memorial Fund, please click here.

About the Author
Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Lavon Palmer: Inspiring Alliance Hospice Volunteer

By R. Bruce Dalglish

If only we could clone volunteers like Lavon Palmer, the world would be a better place. When Lavon is not busy working with her husband in their home improvement company, or spending time with her own family, Lavon spends her free time volunteering for Alliance Hospice.

Since last October, Lavon has been committed to caring for an elderly couple as if they were her own family. The wife, an Alliance Hospice patient, is terminally-ill with Alzheimer’s, and her husband is aging and has problems with his vision.

During Lavon’s visits to the couple’s home twice a week, she takes care of their needs. In addition to doing light housekeeping for the husband so that he can spend some time with his friends, Lavon tends to the wife’s physical and emotional needs.

Lavon wipes the wife’s face with a warm washcloth, and gives her manicures and pedicures. “When I come there, I open up the window and turn on country music for her and she just livens up,” recalls Lavon. “It brings me to tears every time, it’s wonderful. It feels extremely good, feels like my family.”

In addition to visiting with the couple, Lavon calls every day to check in to see if they need anything, and often drives the husband to his own doctor visits due to his impaired vision.

One of the most meaningful parts of Lavon’s volunteering is the special impact she’s made: “When I first went there, she really didn’t have any social skills. But now, when I just look into the room where she is, she just looks at me, smiles and laughs.”

Lavon’s step-daughter is a nurse at Alliance Hospice, and is the one who originally recommended that Lavon look into volunteer opportunities there last fall. Now, Lavon says, “It’s very fulfilling because it’s volunteer work, and not a job that I have to do.”

If you are interested in volunteering for Alliance Hospice like Lavon Palmer, please email: info@alliancehospice.com.

About the Author 

Bruce Dalglish has served as the Chairman and CEO of Alliance Hospice and All Caring Hospice since 2005. In this role, Bruce Dalglish oversees the development and strategic direction of both companies. From 2008 – 2013, Bruce Dalglish served on the Public Policy Committee of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO).

Follow R. Bruce Dalglish on Twitter.

Disclaimer: Blogs by R. Bruce Dalglish provide educational information, not medical advice. Please consult with your medical providers when making end-of-life care decisions.